The Brussels Map Circle

Home → News

News

Een bijna vier eeuwen oude kaart van het Land van Aalst, bewaard in het Algemeen Rijksarchief (Belgïe), is dankzij een grondige restauratie in ere hersteld. Deze vooralsnog onbekende grote wandkaart (127 x 160,5 cm) dateert van 1626 en wordt toegeschreven aan de Aspelaarse cartograaf Philips De Dijn.
De opdracht tot restauratie werd gegeven door de Geschiedkundige Vereniging Het Land van Aalst, die naar aanleiding van haar 70e verjaardag in 2018 een jubileumnummer aan dit pronkstuk en aan de figuur van Philips De Dijn heeft gewijd. De restauratie was mogelijk dankzij projectsubsidies van de Vlaamse Overheid.
Waarom de kaart in het Arenbergarchief (Algemeen Rijksarchief) terechtkwam, is onduidelijk. De kaart is op het zuiden georiënteerd en beslaat het gebied van de kasselrij Land van Aalst (regio tussen Schelde en Dender). Op de kaart zijn figuratieve stadsplattegronden van Aalst, Geraardsbergen, Ronse en Zottegem te vinden, maar ook plattegronden van buiten het landsterritorium gelegen steden zoals Dendermonde, Gent, Lessen, Ninove en Oudenaarde. De parochiekerken, wegeninfrastructuur, waterlopen, bossen en belangrijke gebouwen op of nabij de landsgrenzen zijn eveneens weergegeven. Buiten het gecarteerde deel valt meteen de architectonische constructie met vijf pilaren op, die staan voor de vijf baanderijen: de Landen van Rode, Gavere, Zottegem, Boelare en Schorisse.
Source: http://www.arch.be/index.php?l=nl&m=nieuws&r=alle-nieuwsberichten&a=2019-01-28-prachtige-wandkaart-van-het-land-van-aalst-gerestaureerd

Posted on

Contents

  • Exhibitions
    • Cartography in the Friuli region
    • The Horizons of the Beauce: Maps of the former Granary of France
    • The Republic Models the World
  • Looks at Books
    • The World seen from Asia - A Cartographic History
    • The Cooperplate Engraver Karl Kolbe (1777-1842) and his Circular Maps
  • History and Cartography
    • Peter Kolbe's Maps of the Cape of Good Hope
  • How I got into Cartography
    • Interview with Karen De Coene
  • Brussels Map Circle news
    • 20th Anniversary Celebration
    • 2019 Programme
    • Thank you Eddy
    • Paris Map Fair Globes & Instruments
  • International news
    • Representation of Space and Otherness
    • Auction calendar

Posted on

The State Archives of Belgium holds a real treasure of cartographic materials, but handing out original maps and plans in the reading rooms bears the risk of deteriorating the state of conservation of these documents. Indeed, repeated unrolling and rolling-up of these maps and plans that are sometimes of considerable size has taken its toll on the documents, which called for a large-scale digitization campaign. In recent years, some 60 000 maps and plans were digitised. This number increases steadily. Roughly 44 000 of these digital images have been processed and are now available for research.
Source: http://www.arch.be/index.php?l=en&m=news&r=all-news&a=2018-10-30-41-000-maps-and-plans-accessible-in-the-digital-reading-rooms-of-the-state-archives

Posted on

The restoration of the scale model of Rome started in October 2018.
This scale model was designed by the French architect Paul Bigot. Originally there were four models, but only two survive to this day: one at the Univerity of Caen, France (his working model) and one at the Art & History Museum in Brussels, Belgium.
The model — on scale 1:400 — measures 11 metres by 4 metres and shows Rome at the end of the 4th century CE.
The restoration started with a thorough cleaning. After this a scan has been made and the lighting, projection and sound brought back to life, together with integration of modern technology.
The restoration should be finished in September 2019. It is made possible with the help of the King Baudouin Foundation.
Read more on http://www.kmkg-mrah.be/rome.

Posted on

Terra Brasilis (Nova Série) é uma publicação da Rede Brasileira de História da Geografia e Geografia Histórica, coletivo nacional de pesquisadores interessados na história da geografia, a geografia histórica, a história do pensamento geográfico, a história da cartografia e a história da geografia escolar, com ênfase no Brasil e na América Latina.
Read more on https://journals.openedition.org/terrabrasilis/

Posted on

Contents:
  • J.-L. Arnaud, Identifier et qualifier les relations entre les publications cartographiques
  • M. Heitzler, Ch. Gkonos, A. Tsorlini, L. Hurni, A modular process to improve the georeferencing of the Siegfried map
  • K. Oláh, M. Gede, Presentation of changes in the legend of celestial globes using virtual 3D models - technical report
  • J. Trachet, Mapping/Painting the Medieval Landscape. A Landscape-archaeological analysis of the medieval landscape as depicted by Pieter Pourbus

Website: http://www.e-perimetron.org/Vol13_2.htm

Posted on

In a rare opportunity, the King Baudouin Foundation has acquired a late 16th-century map by the renowned cartographer Abraham Ortelius depicting Thomas More’s fictional island of Utopia. This unique work will be loaned on a long-term basis to the Plantin-Moretus Museum in Antwerp, where it will be put on prominent display.
Measuring 380 by 475 mm, the Utopia map is an important acquisition for the King Baudouin Foundation's collection and a valuable exhibit for the Plantin-Moretus Museum. It was produced by cartographer Abraham Ortelius in 1595-96 based on the book of the same name by the humanist Thomas More. Twelve copies were printed. However, the map now returning to the museum is the only copy known to survive worldwide. It has been on temporary display in the past, including at the ‘In Search of Utopia' exhibition at M-Museum Leuven in 2016, but will now form part of a permanent public collection.
The map was recently offered for sale by a private collector. The King Baudouin Foundation was able to acquire it for EUR 175 000.00 with money from the Charles Vreeken Fund, which the Foundation administers. This acquisition is fully compatible with the Foundation’s objective of acquiring, promoting and ensuring public access to masterpieces of Belgian heritage, in order to preserve this heritage for future generations. The Charles Vreeken Fund shares this objective, its aim being to acquire works that will substantially enhance the collections of Belgian museums.
Abraham Ortelius (1527-1598) began his career as a map colourist for Christoffel Plantijn before becoming a cartographer and humanist, and one of the leading authors associated with the Plantin Press, where the majority of his atlases were printed. He is best known as the inventor of the modern atlas. His Theatrum Orbis Terrarum of 1570 was the first time a group of maps had been assembled in a single format and style, predating the atlases of his contemporaries Gerard de Jode and Gerardus Mercator by several years. He succeeded in this endeavour thanks to his extensive knowledge and many contacts with scholars throughout Europe.
In designing his map of Utopia, Ortelius adhered faithfully and meticulously to the famous work by Thomas More, half of which was written in Antwerp in 1515 while More was on a diplomatic mission. A satire on the England and Europe of the time, it describes the ideal, imaginary island of Utopia, a country ruled exclusively by reason and where egoism is banished from private and public life. Ortelius could also be something of a social critic, as evidenced by a map of the world on which he quotes the Roman philosopher Seneca: Is this that pinpoint which is divided by sword and fire among so many nations? How ridiculous are the boundaries of mortals!
A high definition photo of the Utopia map can be obtained via dannau.i@kbs-frb.be.
Photos and video rushes are available via belgaimage.be : Utopia map, cartography room with Ortelius' portrait and atlas.
The Utopia map will be on display at the Plantin-Moretus Museum after a scenography change taking place end of October-beginning of November.
From https://www.kbs-frb.be/en/Newsroom/Press-releases/2018/20181004AJOrtelius dated 4 October 2018

Posted on