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Contents

  • Exhibitions
    • Europe revisited: a guided tour through a continent
  • Looks at Books
    • Medieval Islamic Maps: An Exploration
    • Exploring Africa with Ancient Maps
  • Interview: follow-up
    • Where are they now?
  • History and Cartography
    • Deventer and Surhon: How they first mapped the Low Countries
  • Brussels Map Circle news
    • Early Maps of Indonesia - Conference report
    • The Brussels Map Circle Programme for 2018
  • International news
    • Faire la carte et restituer le paysage - A study day at the Château de Vincennes (France)
    • Tracking the map heritage of the Dépôt de la Guerre in France
    • Paris Map Fair, Globes and Scientific Instruments
    • 'Arenberg Auctions' is born
    • News from the Royal Library of Belgium - Maps and Plans department
  • Auction calendar

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La plus grande carte ancienne mise en ligne par l’Université de Stanford
Une immense carte du monde de 1587 vient d’être assemblée et mise à disposition du public par les chercheurs l’Université de Stanford, après son acquisition récente.
C’est une carte composée de pas loin de 60 pages qui vient d’être ajoutée à la Collection Cartographique de David Rumsey, un département de l’Université de Stanford. Ce planisphère de trois mètres avec les parties mises bout à bout est la plus grande carte connue de cette période. Elle a été réalisée par Urbano Monte à Milan en Italie en 1587. L’homme était un féru de géographie, selon le National Geographic. Seulement une copie existe de cette carte vieille de presque un demi millénaire. Les chercheurs de l’Université de Stanford viennent de restaurer cet ensemble scanné par David Rumsey lui-même et son neveu, pour apporter une certaine cohérence dans l’assemblage. Rumsey a acquis le planisphère de Monte en septembre dernier.
Ce planisphère est un témoignage de la vision du monde au XVIe siècle, avec ses incohérences cartographiques, ses approximations mais aussi ses monstres peuplant les contrées reculées comme des licornes en Sibérie, des sirènes, des dinosaures et une première représentation sphérique.
La carte est accessible sur le site de la Collection David Rumsey (1) et une explication (en anglais) (2) réalisée par la cartographe Katherine Parker est à lire également.
(1) https://www.davidrumsey.com/blog/2017/11/26/largest-early-world-map-monte-s-10-ft-planisphere-of-1587
(2) https://s3.amazonaws.com/rumsey3/Monte/Urbano+Monte+Catalog.pdf
Source: Flora Eveno, RTBF. Publié le dimanche 31 décembre 2017 à 15h26

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  • É. Konkoly-Gyuró, G. Király, N. Dezső, P. Balázs, Á. Tirászi, Overview of the 18th-20th century military surveys in the light of the land cover change assessment in Eastern Central Europe
  • J. Cajthaml, T. Janata, Georeferencing of First Military Mapping survey maps in the area of Bohemia using polynomial method

Website: http://www.e-perimetron.org/Vol13_1.htm

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Contents

  • Pietro Janni, Tolomeo, uno «sconfitto della storia»?
  • Klaus Geus, Wer ist Marinos von Tyros? Zur Hauptquelle des Ptolemaios in seiner Geographie
  • Philippe Seubert, Délimitation et divisions de l’Arabie, d’Eratosthène à Ptolémée
  • Silvia Panichi, L’istmo della penisola anatolica
  • Didier Marcotte, Ptolémée ethnographe. Questions de tradition
  • Arthur Haushalter, L’Ibérie de Ptolémée, entre géographie mathématique et procédés empiriques
  • Francesco Prontera, Da Strabone a Tolemeo: cartografia generale e regionale
  • Pascal Arnaud, Le traitement cartographique de l’information périplographique et diaplographique par Ptolémée: quelques exemples
  • Mirjo Salvini, Risalendo il Gaggag con Tukulti-Ninurta II (885 a.C.). In ricordo di Paolo Emilio Pecorella
  • Theodoros Mavrojannis, Alexander the Great "King of Asia" at Arbela and Babylon in october 331 B.C. His Ecumenical Macedonian – Persian Ideology
  • Nathalie Bouloux, Effets d’échelle et quadrillage de l’espace et construction de la carte. La cartographie de Marino Sanudo et de Paolino Veneto (Venise, premier tiers du XIVe siècle)

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The Commission on Topographic Mapping invites papers for a Special Issue of The Cartographic Journal that is planned for November 2018 entitled 'Topographic Mapping: Past, Present and Future'. Contributions may involve research on any aspect of topographic mapping and are especially encouraged from providers, from national and multi-national mapping organisations to community mapping groups. In particular, we welcome submissions relating to the following topics:
  • Advances in production techniques
  • Initiatives for topographic data interoperability and harmonisation
  • History of topographic mapping
  • Relevance and use of topographic maps
  • National styles of cartography
  • New methods of portrayal, especially involving non-representational approaches

A title and abstract of no more than 200 words should be sent to Dr Alex Kent (alexander.kent@canterbury.ac.uk) or Dr Anja Hopstock (ica_topomapping@email.de) by 31 January 2018.
From Soetkin Vervust, Secretary ICA Commission on the History of Cartography

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UPDATE: Collection of cadastre maps and documents online!

From now on, the search engine ‘Search archives’ also allows you to find some 23 423 digital images of primitive cadastral maps and some 61 530 digital images of the minutes of measurement setting the municipal boundaries. These scans originate from the Federal Public Service Finance and can be accessed via the following links:
  • Primitive cadastral maps
  • Minutes of measurement

Consultation is free but if you wish to access the actual images, you need to have a login and password, which you can obtain on the website (http://arch.arch.be/).

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  • Z. Cekula (Riga), Place names in the historic cadastral plan of Dinaburg county: localisation of place names in order to complete the place names database of Latvia
  • G. Gatta, G. Bitelli (Bologna), A historical GIS for the comparison of past and present views: Bologna, yesterday and today
  • M. Storms (Leiden), Maps in the crowd: results of a map georeferencing crowdsourcing pilot project
  • K. Yano, M. Yamaji, S. Imamura, M. Kawashima, K. Okukubo, T. Nishiyama (Kyoto), WebGIS-based application for comparing folding screens of Rakuchū rakugai-zu (Scenes in and around Kyoto) with maps
  • M. Gede (Budapest), Automatic reconstruction of old globes by photogrammetry and its accuracy

Website: http://www.e-perimetron.org/

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Contents

  • Exhibitions
    • Aventuriers des mers (Sea adventurers)
  • Looks at Books
    • Finding the North and other secrets of orientation of the travellers of the past
    • Orbis Disciplinae - Tributes to honour of Patrick Gautier Dalché
    • Mapping Asia Minor. German orientalism in the field (1835-1895)
  • History and Cartography
    • The discovery of the earliest known map of Monaco (c.1589)
    • A recently discovered portolan chart. Maybe one of the oldest extant? The Avignon chart.
  • Interview
    • Interview with Martijn Storms
  • Brussels Map Circle news
    • Map Circle Annual General Meeting 2017
    • The Map Afternoon - MAPAF 2017
    • Excursion to The Hague to visit the VOC-exhibition in the National Archives
    • International Conference 9 December 2017
    • Early maps of Indonesia - Programme
  • News and Calendars
    • International news
    • Auction calendar

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To commemorate the centenary of the end of what then was called the War to end all wars (H. G. Wells 1914) from a cartographical perspective, the International Journal of Cartography (IJoC, see http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/tica20) has invited the ICA Commission on the History of Cartography to guest edit a special issue to appear in November 2018.
The emphasis of the special issue will be on how the first truly global and industrialized war helped to emerge new ways to capture survey data, speed up processing and printing and, last but not least, introducing significant map series. For that focus on technologies and resulting cartographic products, maps on diplomacy and propaganda are intentionally outside the scope of the special issue.
Alongside already solicited contributions the ICA Commission on the History of Cartography does invite expressions of interest by way of submitting brief abstracts on two categories of articles:
  • Overview papers of national scope (about 10-16 pages in print, for IJoC guidelines on the manuscript see http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=tica20&page=instructions) and
  • Papers on special topics (about 4-8 pages in print) either with a regional focus (e.g. the Gallipoli Campaign) or a topical focus (e.g. emergence of aeronautical charts).
For overview papers of national scope special consideration will be given to the following national cartographies of war:
  • United Kingdom (Western Front and other theatres of war)
  • France (Western Front and other theatres of war)
  • Russia (Eastern Europe and Caucasus Front)
  • Italy
  • Japan
To conceptualize a contribution please note that each page in the special issue equals about 700 words, will be printed in full color and that thus a half page size figure takes up about 350 words.
Abstracts should be up to 500 words, plus a brief biographical notice. Abstracts (and subsequently accepted articles) should be written in English.
Deadline for submissions of abstracts: 17 October 2017. Notification of acceptance for the Special Issue: 31 October 2017. Deadline for submissions of manuscript, incl. all attachments (figures): 31 March 2018.
All questions and submissions should be sent electronically to the guest editor: Imre Josef Demhardt, e-mail: demhardt@uta.edu
Dr. Imre Josef Demhardt, Professor & Jenkins and Virginia Garrett Chair in the History of Cartography; Chair: International Cartographic Association, Commission on the History of Cartography, The University of Texas at Arlington, Department of History, Box 19529, Arlington

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